Overwintering Pepper Plants(Cayenne, Jalapeno)

GardenForums.com a friendly and growing community of gardeners. We feature a Garden Discussion Forum and Garden Photo Gallery. It's a fun and friendly place to talk with other gardeners, ask questions, share you knowledge, view and post photos and more! Whether you're a master gardener, or brand new to the hobby, you'll find something of interest here.



Hello from Cleveland! I'm new here and let me just say I'm loving the forums so far.

So here's my question: I decided to start growing plants this spring so I chose what seemed to make the most sense to me--peppers! I've always been a sucker for the burning sensation from hot peppers. This year I started off with a simple Burpees All alarm hot mix(Cayenne, Jalapeno, Serrano, Anaheim, and Hungarian Wax). So far it's been a great success. I have some serious growth and I couldn't be happier.

Anywho, I'm thinking about trying to keep my jalapeno and cayenne plants(1 of each) over the winter. I live on the seventh floor and I have windows where it can get sun for a good part of the day. From everything that I've read online it seems possible, but I'm worried about the lack of sun here in Cleveland.

Also, I don't plan on using any hydroponics--just plain old dirt in a pot. I've also read that aphids can be a problem at times, so I'm thinking about using some hydrogen peroxide if the problem arises.

So to sum up, I will be overwintering two peppers with nothing more than dirt and some water. Is this doable? Will bugs be an issue? Will the gloomy winter be too much for the plant? Should I still water daily?

If anyone has any other info, please share. I'm a little green to this whole gardening thing.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
I know it can be done. I saw a couple of pepper plants inside a home in Anchorage, AK. They weren't as full as we are accustomed to with outside plants, but they survived and made peppers.
 

becki25msmolly

New Member
I think if your worried about light you could always set up a grow light. But other then that I'm sure they will do fine. I'm in INdiana and I grow jalepenos in the house in winter. They aren't as abundant as my summer peppers but they produce enough to make enough salsa to get us by.
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
Eric,
You should have no problem keeping your plants over the winter inside. As you mentioned light would be an issue and Gloria has the correct answer. Just remember not to water them too much inside. They like to dry all the way out , but on the flip side the indoor heating can be a problem so reaching a happy medium may take a little trial and error. Humidity is a big key with indoor growning , as you know humidity and watering are not the samethings. So take care to keep some moisture in your air for success.
 
First of all- thanks to everyone for the quick responses.

Eric,
You should have no problem keeping your plants over the winter inside. As you mentioned light would be an issue and Gloria has the correct answer. Just remember not to water them too much inside. They like to dry all the way out , but on the flip side the indoor heating can be a problem so reaching a happy medium may take a little trial and error. Humidity is a big key with indoor growning , as you know humidity and watering are not the samethings. So take care to keep some moisture in your air for success.
Thanks for all the info, CG. I had no idea that humidity was important. Interesting. I will make sure to keep an eye on that. So to sum up: low water level, moderate humidity--got it.

I think if your worried about light you could always set up a grow light. But other then that I'm sure they will do fine. I'm in INdiana and I grow jalepenos in the house in winter. They aren't as abundant as my summer peppers but they produce enough to make enough salsa to get us by.
That's reassuring. I hope I can have the same success. I'm going to try and overwinter these with just sunlight this time around. If I run into any problems I will try lighting next winter. btw, salsa sounds really good, I think I'll make some this summer once my peps come in.

I know it can be done. I saw a couple of pepper plants inside a home in Anchorage, AK. They weren't as full as we are accustomed to with outside plants, but they survived and made peppers.
Thanks, Randy. Once again that's very encouraging. If it can be done in AK, there's hope for Ohio.

Thanks again everyone, I will post pictures this winter if everything turns out as planned.
 

Flower4Yeshua

Super Moderator & vegemm
Staff member
OH Yes..all the information mentions thus far is great and right on.....you can over winter them very well...I use to do this when in CJ...I also used a Q-Tip and went from flower to flower to pollinate them and even got tiny peppers...when we lived in South America my dad had two pepper plants that were like trees...just beautiful...he would plant them out doors in summer and then dig them up and pot them and bring themin for winters...
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
Good point on the pollenation Debe!
Eric,
If you get flwoers while over wintering you know you are doing it right!!!!!
 
OH Yes..all the information mentions thus far is great and right on.....you can over winter them very well...I use to do this when in CJ...I also used a Q-Tip and went from flower to flower to pollinate them and even got tiny peppers...when we lived in South America my dad had two pepper plants that were like trees...just beautiful...he would plant them out doors in summer and then dig them up and pot them and bring themin for winters...
Thanks for the tip about manual pollination, F4Y. If I get flowers I'll definetly try it!

Btw, I so envy you. That would be amazing to live in SA. For now, the closest I can get to that is visiting my sister in FL, LOL. Not the same but I take what I can get!

Good point on the pollenation Debe!
Eric,
If you get flwoers while over wintering you know you are doing it right!!!!!
I can promise that if I get flowers this winter I will be ecstatic! For now, I'm just happy that my peppers are even producing pods at all. :p
 


Gardenforums.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

Top