Seascape Strawberries

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GrowLightGuy

New Member
This is only after two weeks of planting bareroots that I got from Nourse Farms. I have to say, they're way better quality from last years Burpee pants (all died within weeks). Crossing my fingers!

 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
Looking good. I don't have any strawberries but I do buy them for jam making.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
It's easy to make. I buy powdered pectin and there is an instruction sheet in every box. I do the cooked jam as I don't like to take up the freezer space with freezer jam, but that's just my personal preference. Both methods are on that instruction sheet. My daughter prefers the freezer jam method but she doesn't make jam that often. Another source for step-by-step instructions is the 'Ball Blue Book of Canning'. I believe I have written up some step-by-step instructions also and I will check my documents file and see what I have. It may already be posted on this site though under the food preservation part of the site.
 

GrowLightGuy

New Member
It's easy to make. I buy powdered pectin and there is an instruction sheet in every box. I do the cooked jam as I don't like to take up the freezer space with freezer jam, but that's just my personal preference. Both methods are on that instruction sheet. My daughter prefers the freezer jam method but she doesn't make jam that often. Another source for step-by-step instructions is the 'Ball Blue Book of Canning'. I believe I have written up some step-by-step instructions also and I will check my documents file and see what I have. It may already be posted on this site though under the food preservation part of the site.
Thank you Randy!
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
I looked for what I thought I may have posted, but didn't find it. Doesn't mean it isn't there though. I have some general instructions on my desktop computer and I will get that posted. Then you can apply the special instructions if any, from the sheet that comes with your pectin. You can actually make jam without added pectin and that is how it was done years ago. But it is so much simpler using the added pectin and you're much more likely of getting a good product. The cooking time when using added pectin is much shorter than without and you get a much more natural fruit flavor with the shorter cooking time.
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
HOME CANNING INSTRUCTIONS

1. Select quality ingredients at their peak of freshness; prepare them according to a tested recipe. Assemble jars, lids, bands and canning equipment. Check all items to ensure they are in good working condition. Check the sealing edge of the jar to be sure there are no nicks or cracks in the glass.
2. Process high-acid foods in a boiling-water canner. A pressure canner can be used, but leave the weight off the steam port to allow steam to escape. A large saucepot can also be used for a canner as long as it is deep enough to allow an inch or two of water above the tops of the jars. If a saucepot is used, there should be a device in the bottom for keeping the jars from being directly on the bottom of the pot. High-acid foods include jellies, jams, preserves, marmalades, and other soft spreads. Fruits, tomatoes (with added acid), pickles, relishes and chutneys are also high-acid foods.
3. Process low-acid foods in a pressure canner. Low-acid foods include vegetables, meats, poultry, seafood, and combination recipes (with high-acid and low-acid ingredients) and must be canned in a pressure canner according to recipe directions..
4. Wash jars, lids, and bands in hot soapy water. Rinse well. Dry bands and set aside. Heat jars and lids in hot water (180 degrees), keeping them hot until used. I like to use the oven to keep the jars hot and take them out as needed. Do not boil lids. For recipes requiring less than 10 minutes processing, sterilize jars by boiling them for 10 minutes. At elevations higher than 1,000 feet above sea level, add 1 minute for each 1,000 foot increase.
5. Fill hot jar with prepared recipe. Leave recommended headspace; ¼” for fruit juices, pickles, and soft spreads; ½” for fruits and tomatoes; 1” for vegetables, meats, poultry and seafood. I have also read some instructions that say to allow only 1/8” headspace. Check each recipe for pertinent instruction.
6. Remove air bubbles by sliding a non-metallic spatula between the jar and food; press gently on the food to release trapped air. There is a utensil that comes with the canning kit distributed by Ball that is designed for this purpose. A plastic knife works well also. Repeat this process 2 or 3 times around the jar.
7. Wipe rim and threads of jar with a clean, damp cloth. Center heated lid on jar with sealing compound next to glass. Screw band down evenly and firmly until a point of resistance is met – finger-tight. Putting too much pressure on the ring can prevent venting of the jar contents (air) and possibly deform the lid.
8. Place jar in canner. Repeat procedure for filling jars until canner is full or you run out of jars. Do not allow jars to be tight against each other. Breakage will result. Process filled jars following the method and processing time indicated by the tested recipe. If there is sufficient depth in the canner, jars may be placed on top of other jars as long as there is 1 to 2 inches of water above the jar lids.
9. When processing time is complete, remove the jars, place them upright on a towel in a draft-free location and allow them to cool for 6 to 12 hours. I use sections of corrugated cardboard boxes instead of towels to insulate the jars from the cool cabinet top. The towel or cardboard is to prevent cracking the jar when it comes into contact with the cool cabinet top. Bands should not be retightened.
10. After jars are cool, test for a seal by pressing the center of the lid. If the lid does not flex up and down, the lid is sealed. Remove bands. Wipe jars and lids with a clean damp cloth. Label and store jars in a cool, dry, dark place. If a jar does not seal, check the rim of the jar for food particles. The jar can be re-processed with a new lid, if desired. If not re-processed, refrigerate immediately and use the product as soon as possible. I have seen a few jars that had an uneven top and would not seal.

Equipment needed in a canning session;
Water bath or pressure canner
Jars – must be clean and sterile. I use the oven for sterilizing and keeping the jars hot.
Lids & Rings – can be washed with the jars. I use a lid rack in one of the saucepans to keep clean and sterile
Pectin
Sugar
Canning Tray – My canning tray has canning supplies in it; rubber gloves, tongs, labels, etc.
Plastic Tub – used for hauling jars or finished product
Ladle – used for filling jars
Spoons (large & Small) – used for stirring jam or handling small quantities of product when filling jars.
Saucer – resting place for ladle and spoons
Funnel – used for filling jars
Tongs – used for handling hot jars
Clean Wash Cloth – dedicated wash cloth for wiping jar rims to insure seal
Water Saucepans (2) – one for lids and the other for sterilizing jars if you don’t use an oven
Jam Pot – large enough to have plenty of room for product to boil vigorously
Cardboard Pads – instructions call for towels to set jars on, but I like to use cardboard
 

woodstock

Well-Known Member
I bought blueberry plants from norse farms and they are a very good company.....good luck with your strawberries......
 


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