Banana tree not producing

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GPM

New Member
For the past 4 years, I've had two Musa Banana dwarf trees indoors. This year I finally decided to throw both of them outside for the summer. One tree was 8' tall and the other was 6'. They grow pretty quick, however, do not produce anything yet. A week ago, I cut both of them down to the ground (pot) knowing that both plants produced new tree sprouts coming up from the soil. Why aren't they producing bananas when mature ?
 

Mainegal

Super Moderator
Staff member
Sorry I can't help on this subject as I have no clue but someone will come along and help you. I wanted to stop by and welcome you to the forum. It's a friendly site with lots of knowledgeable ppl. Glad you have stopped by and hope you see you around more.
Welcome
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
Welcome to our forum GP!
Do you fertilize them, if so which fert do you use....
I would suggest you use one with a high middle and last number such as 7-30-15 once they start growing again.
They also need a soil is well drained and high in organic matter. Any good quality soil-less mix will do, such as Pro-Mix!
 

GPM

New Member
I've tried fertilizer and they'll both get yellow leaves from it. I use 10-10-10 only in the summer, every 4 weeks.

It's funny you asked about the organic potting soil. One was planted in just that. The other was black soil from my farm plus some peat moss to loosen it up.

Both have been chopped to the soil and have produced a new shoot. They're about a foot tall now. Just the other day I took them back inside due to the colder weather & winter.

Can links be posted to show pictures of what I'm talking about ? This will lead to my website.
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
Can links be posted to show pictures of what I'm talking about ? This will lead to my website.
That would be great!
Or, you can post photos here!
Try a low nitrogen fert next year and see what happens.
Yellowing leaves may me they are getting too much sun....try morning sun and afternoon shade.
For summering out my tropicals I use 10-30-15 and half strength every other week!


To use our photo manager click Post Reply then scroll down to the Manage attachments. You can upload 5 photos per post.
 
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GPM

New Member
My link: . You'll see that I'm into much more than gardening.

It's too dark now to take pictures. I'll get them in the morning sometime. Let me know if there is "anything" out of whack with the site. I'll correct it then.
 
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Flower4Yeshua

Super Moderator & vegemm
Staff member
Welcome to the place ...looking forward to getting to know you...

Just so you know...for now I took the link to your web site out...I do think Ron was giving the OK for a link to pictures for your gardening troubles...
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
We frown on any site that is used for profit!

Interesting photos of your musa!
They do not look very vigorous!
They look like they have a case of spidermites which can cause lack of vigor.
 
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GPM

New Member
Didn't see any spider mites on the plants. What you are seeing is the new shoots from the old towering ones chopped down. Aren't spider mites red ?
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
Ok I didn't have time to read all post but here is what I know about banana trees.
First you shoukd never cut them to the ground if you want them to produce,. They must have their "crown" in tact from year to year. You allow the trees to die back , do not remove dead leaves until spring, the dead leaves help protect the trees from weather damage. They like fertile well drained , but damp soil. Semi shade to full sun and mild conditions. They will even do well in sand if they get fed. If the crown gets muchy, wait until it has dried before removing it to the stump. You have to think natural progression with these trees. Too much care will result in no fruit.
Hope these tips help.
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
Good answer Nancy!
You would be the one to know the culture and care of musa!

GPM
The spidermites that Im talking about a white. They form a fine silky webbing on the leaves.
 

GPM

New Member
Didn't see any mites on either one, Ron. I'll try to post pictures here instead of my advertorial website.

Nancy,

Having put these trees outside until two weeks ago, they get good morning sun but some strong winds. The leaves get all shredded looking and ratty. So what you're saying is to not cut any of the old leaves until they dry out ? And the stumps too ?
Are the new sprouts indication of fruiting on the old foliage ?

On a different note: The water I use is from my rain barrel. Before freezing temperatures, I'll collect the 50 gallons of rain water and store it in the basement.
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
GPM,
Bananas do get ratty , even in the best of conditions.Sadly I have never found a way to keep them from tearing . You can trim ratty leaves and if you are not going to leave your tress in conditions of extreme cold ( under about 35* F for bananas) you don't have to wait until spring to trim away dead leaves. IF they will be in an unconditioned area like a garage where you have not control of temp, then you would want to let the leaves stay and cover the crown and trunk to retain much needed heat. In no case do you ever want to trim the trunk or stalk if you intend to have fruit. It takes generally 2 years for the crown to recover and once again bear fruit.
I had a severe 3 day freeze last year and my trees ( planted out side) died back to the roots. The old crowns died and the trunk then dried up. While they have recovered from the root and look great there will be no fruit untill maybe next spring. You will notice that you tree will come back from the center with new growth. This is also where you need to watch for pest infestations. While in the souther climates rather rare I amm not sure if you might be in danger of pest.
Aniother thing when you see the flowering bud , do not do anything to it. if you remove dried leaves you may damage the fruit production. It's a little ugly when the bloom is over but the fruit are worth it.
 

GPM

New Member
Well, I've waited 4 years for them to grow and re-sprout without results. The new shoots are off to the side of the stump.

Here in Illinois it got unseasonably cold in the past two weeks. This is the time I chopped and moved them inside. Like I said earlier, no mites or bugs that I can tell. Some gnats came in, but my carnivorous plants take care of this.

What about the lower leaves that fold over ? These are still green but look like a folded umbrella. You're saying to leave them on there until they turn brown ?
 

PRH

Well-Known Member
GPM,
Bananas do get ratty , even in the best of conditions.Sadly I have never found a way to keep them from tearing . You can trim ratty leaves and if you are not going to leave your tress in conditions of extreme cold ( under about 35* F for bananas) you don't have to wait until spring to trim away dead leaves. IF they will be in an unconditioned area like a garage where you have not control of temp, then you would want to let the leaves stay and cover the crown and trunk to retain much needed heat. In no case do you ever want to trim the trunk or stalk if you intend to have fruit. It takes generally 2 years for the crown to recover and once again bear fruit.
I had a severe 3 day freeze last year and my trees ( planted out side) died back to the roots. The old crowns died and the trunk then dried up. While they have recovered from the root and look great there will be no fruit untill maybe next spring. You will notice that you tree will come back from the center with new growth. This is also where you need to watch for pest infestations. While in the souther climates rather rare I amm not sure if you might be in danger of pest.
Aniother thing when you see the flowering bud , do not do anything to it. if you remove dried leaves you may damage the fruit production. It's a little ugly when the bloom is over but the fruit are worth it.

------
Interesting there!
 

GPM

New Member
What about the lower leaves that fold over ? These are still green but look like a folded umbrella. You're saying to leave them on there until they turn brown ?

Any answers to these questions ?
 

RonsGarden

Super Moderator
Staff member
What about the lower leaves that fold over ? These are still green but look like a folded umbrella. You're saying to leave them on there until they turn brown ?

Any answers to these questions ?
As long as the leaves are green leave them be!
The more foliage the better to build up a reserve of energy the musa needs in order to send up a blooming stalk!
Once a leaf turns brown you can then just remove the leave, but leave the stem.
 

GPM

New Member
That's probably why I did not get any blooms. When the leaves drooped, I cut them off. Droopy leaves look like a folded umbrella and ugly, but I'll "leave" them alone this time regardless of what my wife says.

Thanks for all the tips.
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
Well, I've waited 4 years for them to grow and re-sprout without results. The new shoots are off to the side of the stump.

Here in Illinois it got unseasonably cold in the past two weeks. This is the time I chopped and moved them inside. Like I said earlier, no mites or bugs that I can tell. Some gnats came in, but my carnivorous plants take care of this.

What about the lower leaves that fold over ? These are still green but look like a folded umbrella. You're saying to leave them on there until they turn brown ?
Hi GPM,
you will not get blooms if you cut the trunk (aka stalk or main trunk of the tree)anywhere. There is a crown if it is cut or frozen it will take 2 years of continuos growing with no disruption of the crown to produce fruit. When your "season" ends try your best not to "chop" the trunk down. Even if you only cut the top few inches you are cutting the crown. Bring the plant into protected area and allow to naturally die back , Keeping the brown leaves as protection of the trunk until you see new green shoots in spring , then you can cut the old brown leaves from the trunk. Never strip them down so that you pull flesh from the tree.
The side shoot you mentioned are NEW trees, the came back from the root of the damaged tree. It will take at least 2 years to obtain fruit from the providing they do not freeze or die back to the stump again. Anytime the main trunk dies back you are starting from ground zero. Being tropical they really don't respond well to freezing. They are designed to grow without a down season.
And yes Ron is correct, leave the leaves.
 


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