panicum virgatum 'northwind'

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flybynyte

New Member
zone 4 newbie! (to the forum, that is).....

trying to figure out what is going on with my pv 'northwind'. it's located in with other perennials. anyway, the first year or two, it's growth was very impressive---sturdy, and that nice "v" shape. last year, and, now this year, it's only putting up a few blades of grass. the blades that do come up, appear to be normal---just very few of them.

just kinda puzzled by this---wondering if it may need to be moved to a bit sunnier spot? could i move this plant now?

any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
Welcome Flybynyte,
Ron has given you great advice. Let us know how it works out for you. Look forward to seeing you around the forums.
 

Bernie

New Member
Hi Fly! I don't know the first thing about grasses but wanted to welcome you to GF. I'm in the PNW.
 

flybynyte

New Member
thanks for the advice----and, the "welcomes", of course!!!

have been gone to my sister's farm in nebraska for a period of time, so, haven't been back to the forum.

my 'northwind' is located in an area that gets full sun-----but, some of the plants around the area come up much earlier in the season-----wonder if that might be cutting down on the soil 'warm-up' and some of the sunlight. anyway, guess it's a thought. i like it where it is, but, it just doesn't seem to be doing what it should---it looked so great the first year or two. i plan on moving it to a spot a little more out in the open and see what happens there.

big "shout out" to everyone!

thanks again!
 

Papa2mykids

New Member
Hi flybynyte and welcome.

I haven't been on here much as of late, but let me see if I can be of help.

Panicums, lovely grass I have a few different cultivars. They are considered a warm weather grass (come up later and bloom in late summer to early fall).

Some grasses are called cool weather grasses like Feather reed grass because they are up and growing , often before the snow melts and bloom in June and July, sometimes earlier.

It sounds like your grass may be getting choked out from early season growth blocking sunlight, much like trees do to lawn grass.............. nice the year you plant it, but thins out until it is gone. if the clump was to big, you would have the donut look but otherwise healthy.

Now here is a catch or a key to moving grasses.

Because cool weather grasses bloom early in the year, they have time to recharge and store energy before winter. Because they have this source, they can be moved in the fall.

Warm weather grasses on the other hand, have spent all their energy growing and blooming late in the year and are very weak in late fall and you risk loosing your plant all together if you move it in a weakened state before winter.

Because of this, it is best to move warm weather grass in the spring, especially if you live in an area where there is harsh winter weather.

Hope this helps you and other readers.

www.gardening-for-wildlife.com/native-grasses.html


Ron
www.gardening-for-wildlife.com
 

flybynyte

New Member
Hi flybynyte and welcome.

I haven't been on here much as of late, but let me see if I can be of help.

Panicums, lovely grass I have a few different cultivars. They are considered a warm weather grass (come up later and bloom in late summer to early fall).

Some grasses are called cool weather grasses like Feather reed grass because they are up and growing , often before the snow melts and bloom in June and July, sometimes earlier.

It sounds like your grass may be getting choked out from early season growth blocking sunlight, much like trees do to lawn grass.............. nice the year you plant it, but thins out until it is gone. if the clump was to big, you would have the donut look but otherwise healthy.

Now here is a catch or a key to moving grasses.

Because cool weather grasses bloom early in the year, they have time to recharge and store energy before winter. Because they have this source, they can be moved in the fall.

Warm weather grasses on the other hand, have spent all their energy growing and blooming late in the year and are very weak in late fall and you risk loosing your plant all together if you move it in a weakened state before winter.

Because of this, it is best to move warm weather grass in the spring, especially if you live in an area where there is harsh winter weather.

Hope this helps you and other readers.

www.gardening-for-wildlife.com/native-grasses.html


Ron
www.gardening-for-wildlife.com


thanks for the comments (and links), Ron. i believe i will let my 'northwind' stay put this season. and, yes, we can have very harsh winters in this area (northern reaches of zone 4). will plan on moving/dividing next spring.
 


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