recipes from Germany

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Kya D

Active Member
Oma, Do you make rouladens.:confused: I decided to start this thread for Greman recipes
I loved these when my friend in Germany made them for me. Dill pickles and steak made such a crazy combo:eek:
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
I'll see if I can find that one in my book, Kya. I don't even know what they are.
 

oma2

Member
Kya, in fact I make them all the time. It is one meal that is requested quite often with the family.

Rindsroulade

Thin cut round steak (milanese cut)
Sliced onions cut in wedges
Dill pickle cut in slices the long way
raw bacon
salt and pepper to taste
toothpicks
Flour to roll meat in before browning in hot oil

Salt and pepper meat on side being rolled up
Piece of bacon, onion wedge slices, dill pickle slice
Roll like a jelly roll from bottom up
Secure with toothpick to fasten
Roll in flour to coat
Heat fat/ oil in pan and brown roulade well on all sides

In pressure cooker cook about 20 minutes. I add beef stock enough to cover rouladen and a little bit of V-8 for color.
In pan where you browned the rouladen add Tbsp flour and stir well. Add remainder of onion until glassy. Add boiling water and slowly stir well with fork to dissolve crust on bottom of pan and to prevent lumps. Cover pan. Simmer slowly for 1 hour. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Serving size: 1 roulade per person
 
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Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
I'll check the book again, because there are some other letters in front of the word I was looking for and I remember seeing those (rind).
 

palmettogal

New Member
Will have to try rindsroulade and hopefully some more German recipes will get posted here. I loved the food when we were over visiting our daughter and her family in 2006. I've tried a few recipes at home, most memorable my disastrous attempt at making homemade spaetzle! Simple enough to make but wasn't even close in taste to the real thing. We threw it out. So come on, Oma, and share, share, share!
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
My wife said she remembers her grandmother making spaetzel and I think she said she tried it also, but I don't remember it. I talked with her the other night about traditions and when I suggested the "southern" tradition of black-eyed peas and ham on alternate years with Sauerbraten on the other years, she was open to that. New Year's Day is on a Friday and that is my day to cook anyway, so she said I could cook anything I wanted to. Pretty generous of her, don't you think? LOL
 

palmettogal

New Member
Think so, Randy...wow, not sure I could bypass black-eyed peas, ham, and collards for new year's even though none of the three ever made me any richer (or poorer). Now, if I could just wing me a trip over to Germany (or Italy where my daughter is now) I'd give up tradition for the trip and a chance to eat the local cuisine! Now you've got me wondering about the New Year's traditions for other countries...
 

oma2

Member
When I make Spaetzle I really don't use a recipe. It is made with flour, water, salt and eggs. My rule of thumb is 1-1/2 cups of flour per person. For every 2 cups of flour I add 1 egg. Water amounts depend on how firm I want the dough. I use less water to get the dough firm. I use a wooden spoon to mix everything in a bowl. Once it is blended I use a folding method and continue lifting the dough with the wooden spoon until the dough forms bubbles. This usually takes 10 minutes to get the correct consistency. I have a spaetzle press which looks like a ricer. I load up the dough a little at a time and then press it into boiling salted water. Once the nooodles float to the surface I remove them into a dish. Then continue with the process until all the dough is cooked. Any leftover spaetzle can be fried up with scrambled egg over them. They are alot of work but worth it! Yum!!:)

Here is a recipe with exact amounts that I found in one of my German cookbooks
4 - 1/2 cups of flour
3 eggs
1 cup water
1Tbsp. salt

Prepare a firm dough from the flour, eggs, water and salt. Beat until it comes easily away from the sides of the bowl. Form dumplings and cook in boiling salted water. Skim them out, dip in cold water and serve on a hot platter.

serves 4
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
One of the men at the nursing home I visit told me that his family always had roast goose on New Year's. I have tried goose many years ago, but I can't say that I liked it much. It is quite possible though that it wasn't prepared right. But it isn't likely that I will ever attempt it again either. That was back in the days when I hunted a lot. I don't hunt at all any more. I did get a skunk the other night though out by the chicken pen.
 

oma2

Member
Randy we once had goose for Christmas but it was quite fatty so I really don't care to have another one. In the Spring a friend of ours always had Wild Beast feast and I remember having goose kabobs which were marinated in orange juice. Now they were quite tasty!:)
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
That would be worth trying, but I doubt I'll ever have the opportunity again. In the past, I hunted a lot and I had plenty of ducks and some geese along the way. But I had a change of heart and don't hunt any more. I don't fault anyone that does, but I won't any more. I prefer looking at the critters. There are some exceptions to that though. I still try and get the moles, gophers, rats, mice and critters like that.
 

Mainegal

Super Moderator
Staff member
That would be worth trying, but I doubt I'll ever have the opportunity again. In the past, I hunted a lot and I had plenty of ducks and some geese along the way. But I had a change of heart and don't hunt any more. I don't fault anyone that does, but I won't any more. I prefer looking at the critters. There are some exceptions to that though. I still try and get the moles, gophers, rats, mice and critters like that.
I need to know if a gopher is the same as a ground hog or something different?
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gophers are pretty small compared to a ground hog. I think they are about 10" long including their tail.
 

oma2

Member
Christmas Stollen

Here is one of our favorites for Christmas. :D
Allow plenty of time since this recipe is an all day prroject with all the rising.

3/4 cups raisins
1/2 cup chopped dried cranberries, cherries, blueberries or mixed candied fruit
1/4 cup orange juice
1 pkg.(1/4 ounce) active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (110 - 115 degrees)
3/4 cup warm milk (110 - 115 degrees)
1/2 cup butter melted
1/4 cup sugar
2 eggs, lightly beaten
2 TBSP grated orange peel
1TBSP grated lemon peel
1 tsp. salt
5-1/4 to 5-3/4 cups all purpose flour
1/2 cup chopped almonds
Confectioners' sugar

Soak raisins and fruit in orange juice; set aside. In a large mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in water. Add milk, butter, sugar, eggs, orange and lemon peel, salt, and 3 cups flour; beat until smooth. Add raisin mixture and almonds. Add enough remaining flour to form a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6 - 8 minutes.
Place in greased bowl, turning once to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled. Punch dough down; let rest for 10 minutes. Divide in half; roll each into a 10 X7 inch oval. Brush !/2 of one long side of dough with melted butter, then fold it over to within 1- in. of the opposite side; press edges lightly to seal. Place on a greased baking sheets. Cover and let rise until nearly doubled, about 1 hour. Bake at 375 degrees for 25 -30 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on wire rack. Just before serving, dust with confectioners' sugar.
**If you don't eat it right away, then wrap the loaves in foil and store on counter.

Yields: 2 loaves
**Note: A tsp of rum or rum extract can be added with the mixed fruit for added flavor.
I use a ped-egg to grate the zest from the orange or lemon. It works great!
 

Randy

Super Moderator
Staff member
Woodstock has told me about stollen, but I wasn't sure what it was. Thank you, Oma.
 


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