Anyone good with orchids?

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FLO

New Member
Hi!

I saved my wife's Orchid by putting it under the FLO Bar2 in my hall garden, but I don't know what to do with it now.

I heard you need special dirt.....
 
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Crabbergirl

Super Moderator
Staff member
Hi Flo,
Welcome to Garden Forums!
Orchids are very easy to grow. they require essentailly 3 things. Light, warmth and water. Orchids should be "planted" in orchid mix which is very chunky and not soil at all.
Water orcihds untill water runs through. They typically need to be watered about every for days. Do not keep them saturated as they are actually air plants, much like staghorn ferns. You water soluable fertilizers once a month. They like filtered light and not direct hot sun , grow lights are good but leaves will start to spot if they get too much light. If you orchids "wrinkle" in their leaves you need to back off on the water. Your orchid will tell you when it is not happy.
I have an Asian mane who I consult about orchids. He told me to use a bmboo skewer to test for moisture. You stick the skewer in the orchid pot for 5 minutes. If the skewer when pulled out is wet do not water that day.
You must keep the temp above 60 F. They will not do well in cooler temps . The like tropical type settings warm and humid. If you can produce those condtions you will not need to water as often if at all.
Hope this helps let me know if you have questions.
 

FLO

New Member
I kind of need the pictures to help with my questions. I tried to find one that didn't show the light in it, as I assume that was the problem.

Of course I don't have any that show the whole plant, and not the light. I guess this will have to work for now.

This leaf/root thing is like 15 inches above the pot. Does it need to be cut off, and put in it's own pot?

4114165994_9966bd6200_b.jpg
 

FLO

New Member
The little burned spot on the leaf is from where it grew into the bulb, and I didn't see it for a few hours.

I give it a couple tablespoons of water every day, but it sounds like I can back off.

I keep it in the hall closet, so it stays maybe 3 degrees warmer than the houes. We keep that between 68, and 78F. I have a fan that blows constantly on the whole garden lightly.
 

Kya D

Active Member
Hi Flo
Welcome welcome to our site.
I love orchids but don't grow them.
Some one here is sure to be able to help.
 
Hi FLO, that leaf/root thing could be a keiki, a baby plant. especially if it is growing out of the bloom stalk. It looks quite big and with strong roots, so I guess it can be cut off to be planted on it's own (experts please verify). This orchid looks like the Phalaenopsis type. Over here in Singapore, we either grow them in a pot of sphagnum moss or mount it on a slab of fern bark. Just don't keep it overly moist or the roots will rot. They like bright light but direct sun or too intense light will often burn the leaves.

Hope this helps.
 

Flower4Yeshua

Super Moderator & vegemm
Staff member
You are correct why we pulled the first pictures...We do not allow site links ...thank you for reposting pictures with out your site link
 
Not sure what medium you have over there. Charcoal is a medium that can't go wrong, but it does not retain much moisture. Meaning you have got to water more if the air is dry. Else ask your garden supply store, am sure they will recommend something relevant to where you are.
 

FLO

New Member
Hi FLO, that leaf/root thing could be a keiki, a baby plant. especially if it is growing out of the bloom stalk. It looks quite big and with strong roots, so I guess it can be cut off to be planted on it's own (experts please verify). This orchid looks like the Phalaenopsis type. Over here in Singapore, we either grow them in a pot of sphagnum moss or mount it on a slab of fern bark. Just don't keep it overly moist or the roots will rot. They like bright light but direct sun or too intense light will often burn the leaves.

Hope this helps.
You mentioned direct sun, and intense light being a problem. That's one of the reasons I wanted to show that light. I had it within a half inch of a 23 watt CFL bulb, and then I moved the light up for the other plants. It seemed to be just slightly happier right next to the bulb. Now, I have heard that CFLs give off a more "plant digestable" form of light, and it sure seems to be true. As you can see in the picture, it only burned right where it made contact. Do you think I should move it back near the light? (not touching it, just very close)

I need to get some pictures of the whole thing up here. All my pics that show the whole thing also show the light.

Does anyone have experience growing with CFLs here? That would help a lot. It's a lot different than other indoor lighting. Not to mention hundreds of dollars a month cheaper. (No, I am not selling CFL bulbs. They sell those at the store.)
 

FLO

New Member
What cardboard sign? The website I think you are talking about is printed on the very reflector of my light. It is my website, and I try to include it in as many pictures as I can. It's pretty easy since the plants practically surround it. It's just a marketing tool used the world over. It's why people have logos on their products and boxes. It gets on camera by accident. Free advertising.

I invented an array, and am trying to get myself out there. It is printed on the light, but I am not here trying to sell that. I would have contacted you by email like I usually do, and asked if there was anything we could work out. It has not been a positive route, and I have given up on it. My website has over 150 pictures of my garden for promotional reasons, and that's where I grabbed the pictures from. I intend to take fresh pictures of the orchid when I get a spare minute, I've just been busy.

I am really in the dark about Orchids. They are totally alien to me. I grow vegetables. This was given to my wife when her grandma died, and she kills all plants, so I grabbed it, and stuck it my hall garden.

I have the light on a timer for 16 hours. This is a time I found will work for all my vegetables. It's sort of in the middle of what they all need. It seems to like this also. What do they (orchids) typically need?
 
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Gloria

Super Moderator
Staff member
Wish I could help with the orchids but I don't have any experience in that field. From the pic..it looks happy and healthy. Is that peppers I see on the right side? I've thought about trying a bush or 2 inside during the winter but haven't made the effort yet..
 

Flower4Yeshua

Super Moderator & vegemm
Staff member
flo sorry I didn't see it was not a card board sign...maybe oyu could just cover it for a few pictures...I think the picture you have here gets the point ...I just wish I know more about orchide s to help you...about all I know is how to kill them...have had several and never last longer that a year...
 

FLO

New Member
Wish I could help with the orchids but I don't have any experience in that field. From the pic..it looks happy and healthy. Is that peppers I see on the right side? I've thought about trying a bush or 2 inside during the winter but haven't made the effort yet..
Yep. Those are peppers. I have 3 kinds of peppers, and 4 kinds of tomato in there. I took the new pics of the orchid, and I'll put one of the peppers up too, and one of the tomatoes.

hf156.jpg


hf157.jpg


hf88.jpg


hf93.jpg
 

FLO

New Member
Now that you can see the pot it is in, is it big enough?

Should I discard the old plant once I re-plant the keiki?
 
Now that you can see the pot it is in, is it big enough?

Should I discard the old plant once I re-plant the keiki?
Hi FLO, looks like the mother plant has no leaves left, so it is probably quite unlikely to be of much use. From what I know, Phal do tend to produce babies when they are stressed or in distress... maybe it is for survival of the species.

If I were you, I will harvest and repot the baby plant. The roots are looking quite strong so I think it should be fine. Pot it into a medium that your local garden store would recommend. If you are unsure about the light, perhaps you can start by providing a distance, then when it looks ok, move it up a bit at a time. From my experience, redden leaves usually signals too strong a light.

Hope this helps :)
 

FLO

New Member
The red on the leaf came after I moved it away from the light. That leaf is the newest one. These lights do weird things to plants. Like speed up the flowering process, and fruit development. I like that, it's just remarkable. I think this CFL light is easier for the plants to use/eat or something. Are there any other reasons the leaf would turn red? Maybe it is too cold, or too much in the wind. (I moved the fan the other day)
 


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